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GraphQL Connector

The GraphQL Connector is an outbound protocol Connector that allows you to execute a GraphQL query or mutation from your BPMN process.

Prerequisites

The GraphQL Connector allows you to connect to a GraphQL API endpoint. To use the GraphQL Connector, you need to know the GraphQL endpoint URL, authentication, and available API methods.

Create a GraphQL Connector task

To use a GraphQL Connector in your process, either change the type of existing task by clicking on it and using the wrench-shaped Change type context menu, or create a new Connector task by using the Append Connector context menu. Follow our guide on using Connectors to learn more.

Make your GraphQL Connector executable

To make the GraphQL Connector executable, fill out the mandatory fields highlighted in red in the properties panel:

note

All the mandatory and non-mandatory fields are covered in the upcoming sections. Depending on the authentication selection you make, more fields might be required; this is covered in the next section.

Authentication

You can choose among the available authentication types according to your authentication requirements using the Authentication section.

None

Click None in the Authentication section. No extra authentication configuration is required.

Basic

Create a new Connector secret

We advise you to keep your Password safe and avoid exposing it in the BPMN xml file by creating a secret:

  1. Follow our guide for creating secrets.
  2. Name your secret (i.e GRAPHQL_PASSWORD) so you can reference it later in the Connector.

Configure Basic Authentication

Select the GraphQL Connector and fill out the following properties under the Authentication section:

  1. Click Basic in the Authentication section.
  2. Set Username (i.e. {{secrets.GRAPHQL_USERNAME}}).
  3. Set Password to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.GRAPHQL_PASSWORD}}).

Bearer Token

Create a new Connector secret

We advise you to keep your Bearer Token safe and avoid exposing it in the BPMN xml file by creating a secret:

  1. Follow our guide for creating secrets.
  2. Name your secret (i.e GRAPHQL_BEARER_TOKEN) so you can reference it later in the Connector.

Configure the Bearer Token

Select the GraphQL Connector and fill out the following properties under the Authentication section:

  1. Click Bearer Token in the Authentication section.
  2. Set Bearer to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.GRAPHQL_BEARER_TOKEN}}).

OAuth token

Create a new Connector secret

We advise you to keep your OAUTH_TOKEN_ENDPOINT safe and avoid exposing it in the BPMN xml file by creating a secret:

  1. Follow our guide for creating secrets.
  2. Name your secret (i.e OAUTH_TOKEN_ENDPOINT) so you can reference it later in the Connector.

Configure the OAuth Token

Select the GraphQL Connector and fill out the following properties under the Authentication section:

  1. Click OAuth 2.0 in the Authentication section.
  2. Set OAuth Token Endpoint to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.OAUTH_TOKEN_ENDPOINT}}).
  3. Set Client ID to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.CLIENT_ID}}).
  4. Set Client secret to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.CLIENT_SECRET}}).
  5. (Optional) Set Scopes (i.e. read:clients). Depending on the OAuth provider you're using, this may or may not be required.
  6. Set Audience to the secret you created (i.e. {{secrets.AUDIENCE}}). This is an optional field depending on the OAuth provider you're using.
  7. Choose Client Authentication from the dropdown menu (i.e. Send client credentials in body).

Find more information about the OAuth client credentials flow in the RFC reference.

HTTP endpoint

Under the HTTP Endpoint section, fill in the URL with your desired endpoint and select the desired Method.

GraphQL query

Query/Mutation

Insert your query or mutation you wish to execute here. This must be a syntactically valid instruction. For more details, see the official documentation.

You can use arguments, aliases, directives, and fragments as well. For example:

query Root($id: ID) {
person (id: $id) {
id
name
}
}
note

Secrets are currently not supported in the Query/Mutation of a GraphQL Connector.

note

You can test your queries on publicly available GraphQL API here.

Example

query Query {
allFilms {
films {
title
director
releaseDate
speciesConnection {
species {
name
classification
}
}
}
}
}

Variables

You can specify variables to your queries/mutations.

The Variables field can be configured using the FEEL Map data type.

= {
"id": "{{secrets.GRAPHQL_ENTITY_ID}}",
"includeDroids": false,
}
note

Secrets are not like regular variables and must be wrapped in double quotes (") when used in an expression.

Example

Query:

query Root($id: ID, $includeGender: Boolean!) {
person (id: $id) {
name,
height,
gender @include(if: $includeGender)
}
}

Variables:

{
"id": "cGVvcGxlOjI=",
"includeGender": false
}

Connection Timeout

To set connection timeout in your request, set it in seconds in the Connection Timeout section. This is not a required field, with a default value of 20 seconds. To set an infinite timeout, set this value to 0.

Response mapping

The HTTP response will be available in a temporary local response variable. This variable can be mapped to the process by specifying the Result Variable.

The following fields are available in the response variable:

  • status: Response status
  • body: Response body of your request
  • headers: Response headers

Additionally, you can choose to unpack the content of your response into multiple process variables using the Result Expression, which is a FEEL Context Expression.

= {
person: response.body.data.person
}

The next steps in your process will have access to the graphqlQueryResponse variable that contain the full response and the mapped variable from the result expression: person.